Overcome Resistance to Change by Rewiring Your Brain

rewiring a brainThroughout this website we stress the importance of adopting a brain-healthy lifestyle.

You may have the best intentions to take the advice offered here.

Maybe you’re trying to implement the lifestyle changes we recommend, but are struggling. 

If you’re like most people, you’ve tried to change, but you find it really, really hard (as in “impossible”).

You’ve made the resolutions and set the goals.

When you’ve failed, you’ve tried even harder, but making change stick has still eluded you.

Let’s take a look at why the usual ways of making lifestyle changes often fail.

Then I’ll give you some super-easy but counter-intuitive tips to create new, healthy habits by rewiring your brain

Change the Usual Way Is Hard

Most people rely exclusively on motivation and willpower to make a change.

There are some surprising reasons this doesn’t work. 

Motivation

woman jumping for joyWhen you decide to start a new diet, exercise program, or any self-improvement venture, you are usually psyched!

You just know this time you’re going to stick with it.

You’re excited about the new gym you joined or a new diet book you’ve read, and your motivation is high.

Initially you are motivated by the pleasure of what you want (getting into your skinny jeans, wearing a bathing suit this summer) and the pain of what you don’t want (hating the way you look, having a heart attack).

But motivation naturally diminishes with time

Willpower

When motivation starts to wane, you switch to relying on willpower.

woman choosing foodBut no one has an endless supply of willpower — it is a resource that gets used up.

When your day is filled with things you really don’t want to do, by the end of the day you no longer have any willpower reserve left.

So you spend the evening plopped down in front of the TV munching on unhealthy snacks, vowing to do better tomorrow.

It’s not your fault — you simply have no willpower left to make the healthier, harder choices. (1)

If motivation and willpower let you down, don’t despair!

There is another answer that relies on using the power of your subconscious brain.

Make Change Easy — Rewire Your Brain

According to neuroscientist Dr. Bruce Lipton, author of The Biology of Belief, 95% of your life is dictated by the subconscious mind.

This is the part of your brain that runs a large portion of your life on autopilot enabling you to do many tasks without thinking about them, everything from tying your shoes to driving a car.

When you do something often enough, it becomes a habit. Habits are activities you do effortlessly with minimal thought on your part.

You can appreciate the power of a habit when you try to stop a bad one. It’s tough!

Next, I’ll tell you how to rewire your brain to stop struggling with a healthy lifestyle change by turning it into a habit.

I’m going to use an example of starting a walking program, but these concepts can be used for creating any new healthy habit.

Take Baby Steps

Setting big goals is exciting! 

Telling your friends (and yourself) that you are going to start walking 5 miles a day sounds impressive, but you are probably setting yourself up for failure. 

baby crawling up stepsBut starting with small boring goals, “baby steps”, will greatly increase your chance for success.

There will be many days you won’t walk at all if 5 miles is your goal.

But if you make walking around the block your goal, you can certainly accomplish that!

You will feel good that you’ve honored your commitment to yourself.

But even more important, you’ve created a new neural pathway that turns your daily walk into a habit.

Using small goals tricks your brain.

Your subconscious likes to be in control and doesn’t like change. A huge change often sets up subconscious resistance, but a small change will be accepted.  

Use Triggers

Ask anyone who smokes and they can tell you about triggers.

Most smokers have triggers to smoke after a meal, with a cup of coffee, or after sex.

woman smokingYou can use triggers to your advantage.

When you regularly take a walk after another event (such as eating dinner), your brain will create an association so you’ll automatically be inclined to take a walk after dinner.

You can help yourself with visual triggers, too.

Leave your walking shoes by the front door, keep your pedometer by your keys, or lay your walking attire on your bed to create triggers you can’t miss. 

Be Prepared

If you are going to start a new habit, you need to be prepared. A successful walking habit means more than putting one foot in front of the other.

Initially, you have a few decisions to make.

Where are you going to walk? What time do you want to leave? Are you going to walk alone or solo? Will you bring your dog? Should you bring water? 

Next, get the right equipment to ensure your success.

Get a good pair of comfortable walking shoes and socks to match. Get a water bottle that’s comfortable to carry.

People who use a pedometer walk 27% more than those who don’t, so consider getting one to encourage your success. (2)

The new pedometers are a far cry from the clunky old ones that only measured distance walked. The Fitbit One is a device about the size of a quarter that tracks your steps, distance, calories burned, and even your sleep cycle. Pretty amazing!

Make It Convenient

Put everything you need to take a walk in one convenient place so you can grab it and go.

If your shoes are in the linen closet, your socks are in the bedroom, your house key in your desk drawer, and your left your water bottle in the car, you’ll give up before you get out the door!

Make It Fun

Make your walk something you look forward to.

If you like companionship, find a walking partner. 

If you enjoy music, podcasts, or audiobooks, listen while you walk.

You’ll find the time spent walking flies by!

The Big Red X

When Jerry Seinfeld was an upcoming comedian, he created the habit of writing new material every day using a wall calendar and a red marker.

You can do the same. 

Put up a wall calendar (there are free ones you can print online) in a highly visible place, like on the fridge.

Every day you take your walk, cross out that day with a BIG RED X.

jerry seinfeld big red xYou won’t want to see any blank days which will, as Jerry says, “break the chain.”

I’d listen to Jerry. He’s been pretty successful. ;-)

It’s widely accepted that it takes 30 days to create a new habit, so after one month, your new habit will largely be formed.

Then you can ramp it up to the next level.

Eventually you can turn your walk around the block into a five-mile-a-day habit, if that’s your ultimate goal. 

Mindvalley OmHarmonics meditation system

Small Habits Create Gateways

Lao-Tzu wisely said that “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”  

These techniques can be used for any lifestyle change you want to make — diet, exercise, meditation, stress reduction techniques, and more.

Not sure where to begin? Here are some examples of healthy “baby steps” you could take:

  • Replace one soda with a glass of water.
  • Replace one cup of coffee with a cup of green tea.
  • Eat a handful of raw vegetables as one of your snacks.
  • Have a piece of fruit instead of dessert after dinner.
  • Do 5 minutes of yoga stretches in the morning and in the evening.
  • Meditate for 10 minutes.

Pick one healthy change (or create your own) and commit to doing it daily for 30 days to create a new healthy habit.

Small changes aren’t very exciting, but many people have found using this technique really works to bring lasting change.

Your new habit can serve as a gateway to bigger changes that can significantly improve your life.

To learn even more about how to rewire your brain to change habits, pick up a copy of Surprisingly…Unstuck: Rewire Your Brain to Exercise More, Eat Right, and Truly Enjoy Doing So.

Want to boost your memory, focus, clarity and mood? Find help in the Be Brain Fit Store.

If you want your brain to be healthy and sharp, learn how to treat it right.

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